A Louisiana town is looking at a bill of more than $2 million from repairing the damages of recent flooding, according to the Associated Press.

Lafayette, Louisiana experienced damaged roads and water systems with an increased amount of floating wreckage due to a heavy rainstorm on March 12. The damages are estimated at more than $2 million but this cost does not include additional damage of 1,300 homes in the Acadiana region, as reported by The Advocate.

Officials say that the Northern Lafayette Parish endured the most flood-related damage while 850 houses were impacted in Carencro and nearby areas.

While residents clean up their backyards and homes from debris and ruined furniture, authorities state that it may cost as much as $600,000 to hire a contractor to transfer the wreckage.

Federal guidelines for the contracting practices has decelerated the removal of such debris, as there are certain steps that must be taken in order for a town to be reimbursed for repairs by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

According to city-parish president Joey Dural, if the costs aren't reimbursed by FEMA, then private residents will have to shoulder the costs in taxpayer money. No specific deadline for debris removal has been set as of yet.

"We have a serious issue on our hands. I would encourage the administration and the council not to drag their feet on this issue," city-parish councilman Jay Castille told the Associated Press. "You think the hurricane was bad, it wasn't. This is unbelievable."

Castille also cited that representatives from FEMA were in the area assessing the damages from the flood.

Municipalities attempting to handle claims processing for an excess of flood-related claims should consider implementing catastrophe services from independent claims adjusting companies.