Residents in wildfire country are right to be worried about the local environment: certain conditions could indeed make it easier for flames to spread. However, some factors might be more legitimate than others.

In a recent piece for the Los Angeles Times, ecologist Chad Hanson addressed the issue of dead trees in California, criticizing Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack for claiming that dead trees are an inherent wildfire threat.

According to Hanson, natural tree death due to droughts can lead to healthier environments. At a time when California and Nevada are facing wildfire season once again, proper understanding of these events may influence the way catastrophe services manage wildfire damage claims.

Hanson also described the exact ways that trees burn, which may go against popular belief.

"Trees larger than just a few inches in diameter are not consumed in fires — only the outer bark layer and the needles actually burn up — so the great majority of the dead trees in the forest do not significantly influence fire behavior, even if they are dry," he said.

The National Interagency Fire Center said that the country was at National Preparedness Level 2 as of June 6. This means that large wildfires are present in at least one region, with only "minimal mobilization" of local resources and "moderate commitment" of national resources.

Property adjusters should have the experience to accurately estimate extensive structural damage. Through its extensive network of credentialed adjusters, BrightClaim can assist insurers with locating adjusting resources to handle any type or size of wildfire-related loss.