Wind and hail together recently damaged several homes in North Dakota. According to The Dickinson Press, the town of Killdeer, located in the western-central part of the state, was part of a recent storm system, with wind gusts in nearby Dickinson registering as high as 80 miles per hour. Some of the Killdeer hail was as wide as 3 inches, and in one case it piled up five inches in front of a resident's home.

Video from Ohio Storm Chasers posted on the site shows the heavy precipitation in the area, as well as houses with broken windows and shattered siding. While dangerous individually, the combination of wind and hail seemed to have made the danger to homes even greater.

Denise Brew, emergency manager for Dunn County, downplayed the lasting impact of the storm, despite the damage. "Everything's repairable," she said. "Even though it's pretty terrible, everything can be fixed."

In a forecast report, the National Insurance Crime Bureau looked at the monthly pattern of hail-related loss claims between 2013 and 2015. As damaging as this current storm may be, the statistics show that July typically doesn't produce the highest number of claims throughout the year.

Judging by the monthly average for all three years, hail loss claims peaked in May, with 165,087 cases. Between 2014 and 2015, the number of overall claims (572,182) dropped by 31 percent, a reversal from the 14 percent claims growth seen between 2013 and 2014.

Property adjusters should have the experience to accurately estimate extensive structural damage. BrightClaim, through its network of credentialed adjusters, can assist insurers with handling any type or size of loss.